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to lower the costs of medicare and medicaid and it will not cost anybody anything. that is great politics, it is just not true. so there has got to be some test of realism in any of thesexd proposals, mine included. i have to hold myself accountable and guarantee the american people will hold me accountable if what i am selling does not actually deliver. >> mr. president, a point of clarification. what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals that were offered. >> i understand that. i have actually read your bills. >> through 2009. >> i a understand. -- i understand. >> the summary document you receive this backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi android restoration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> i have read your legislation. i take a look at this stuff and the good ideas we take. here is the thing that all this have to be mindful of. @@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ and support for faith and the un employed and helping people stay on cobra that democrats and republicans would support. maybe there are some things in th
problems with this proposal, this is they're going to go on medicare earlier, which will cost money. they won't be paying taxes 'cause they're not working. but the -- this has budgetary problems way more than what's been analyzed. broadly speaking again, to your point, if you take tarp money and make it a magic slush fund and pay people to join the army $100,000, that would lower the unemployment rate. >> it's going to cost you more money to take a job away from someone who is around that age than it is to keep them in their job. these people need this job to make rent. they are not dead weight. so this notion of retiring them early so that some young person who can live at home and be taken care of by his parents is better for our economy is crazy. >> last word. >> it's a voluntary program. it's not a matter of getting rid of dead wood. it's only people who are willing and ready to leave the work force. those people who are ready to leave ought to be given an incentive so that perhaps a younger worker who is going to be paying into the system can have a shot. >> kucinich is over 60
, have diabetes and are on medicare, call now and we'll send you a free meter. it offers alternate site testing, so you can test on your arm. no more pricking your fingers. so it's less painful. it makes a big difference. and to make it even less painful, the cost of your diabetes testing supplies may be covered by medicare. join over a million others who have chosen liberty medical. call now and get your free meter. plus, for a limited time, get a free cookbook when you join. call t number on your screen. >>> mr. president, a point of clarification, what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals -- >> i understand that. i've actually read your bills. >> -- throughout 2009. >> i understand that. >> rest assured the summary document you received is backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi and your administration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> mike, hold on, hold on a second. [ applause ] >> no, no, no, no. hold on a second, guys. you know, mike, i've read your legislation. i mean, i take a look at this stuff. and the g
the costs of medicare and medicaid and it won't cost anybody anything. that's great politics. it's just not true. so there's got to be some test of realism in any of these proposals, mine included. i've got to hold myself accountable. i guarantee the american people will hold themselves -- will hold me accountable if what i'm selling doesn't actually deliver. >> mr. president, a point of clarification, what's in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals. >> i understand that. i've actually read your bills. >> that were offered throughout 2009. >> i understand. >> rest assured, the summary document you've received is backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pel owes y and your administration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> wait. hold on a second. no, no, no, no, no. hold on a second. you know, mike, i've read your legislation. i mean, i take a look at this stuff. and the good ideas, we take. but here is the thing -- here is the thing, i guess, that all of us have to be mindful of. it can't be all or nothing, one way or the other. yo
insurance plans pay under part d of medicare for prescription drugs. they are taking advantage of their purchasing power. and we're relying on private insurers committee are' competition in part d of medicare, it isn't as effective as the v.a. which does take advantage of its market power. let me just talk for a moment on a private insurance. we rely on private insurance here. it's for-profit insurance. i think it leads to much higher health care costs. private insurers, obviously by definition, they have to make a profit. in addition to that they engage in marketing, they also engage in what we call medical understood writing, they have to hire a lot of actuaries to make sure that they're not taking on people who are too expensive. these are all very costly things. so that raises the price of private insurance. in addition, as i said, they don't have as much bargaining power so they also can't keep their prices low by taking advantage of the consolidated power that i'm talking about. so you might ask, why do we allow private insurance to have quasi-monopoly and the answer is t
. there are so many elements of this, tax breaks for small business, extending the life of medicare. more assistance to seniors for prescription drugs. a cap on out of pocket expenses. help for people with pre-existing conditions. he's saying let's get back to it. if you look at the polling in "the washington post" yesterday on the massachusetts race, it's very clear. people don't want us to walk away from health care. they want us to address their concerns with the program. they want brown to come and work with us and not be obstructionist. that was very clear in the polling. i suggest that the republican party look that poll as well. their policies were viewed more dimly than democratic policies. people were crying out to work together. we're looking forward to working together to pass this on behalf of the american people, who are going to feel greater and greater burden from the health care costs if we don't step up and deal with it. >> you're looking forward to pass this. the president looked like he was trying to reduce the scale. let's coalesce around some core elements, insurance
for medicaid and medicare is of such services. >> the morning. i am susan dencer. happy new year and welcome to our briefing on the national health spending numbers. this is a ritual at the centers for medicare and medicaid services as well as for health affairs to bring out these spending numbers every year, and we are delighted to be able to do that once more. this year we have a historic set of numbers to help cms actuaries and other members unveiled. as you were here and perhaps already read, who have had a historic slowdown in the rate of health spending, the slowest rate of growth in 50 years. of course, the other side of the story is that health spending still grew faster than the overall economy, so we are not out of our long-term trajectory of health-care spending growth continuing to outpace the growth in the gross domestic product. with no further ado, i am going to turn it over to our five panelists to present the data further. you will be hearing from mika hartmann, a statistician in the health statistics group. he works primarily on historical and age-based national health esti
from medicare over ten years the cbo said that course of action would reduce the deficit by more than $130 billion. >> there is a number of things that make that implausible, dubious. >> such as expanding medicaid, shifting some cost to cash-strapped states or double counting savings in medicare, by saying they'd extend the life of the program, but also spending the money elsewhere. >> you it wi literally can't sp the same dollar twice. it won't work. >> then there is the doctor fix in medicare, a move to undo the previous effort to reduce medicare spending. under the current law, dockerors seeing the elderly will have a fee cut next year. they were worried about the effect so they removed it from the reform bill. >> the biggest hole in financing they left out the doc fix. >>> if it were counted the bill shifts from reducing the deficit to make it worse because the doc fix would cost $210 billion. congress still has to fix it anyway, so the house passed it separately, but simply added the cost to the deficit, which troubles democratic centrists. >> the question is how will that be fin
you some money. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... so you could save up to thousands of dollars... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you choose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are no networks and no referrals needed. help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't cover. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... and medicare guide and find out... how you could start saving. >>> i'm jim cramer and welcome to my world. >> he's nuts. they oar nuts. they know nothing. >> there is a bull market somewhere. >> "mad money". y
. in 2002 under the employee initiative the centers for medicare and medicaid services began publicly reporting quality information on nursing-home nationally on their web site. this was followed a year later by a similar effort in the home health arena. simultaneously there have been demonstration products by medicare in home house and skilled nursing facilities. state medicaid agencies have begun experimenting with a for performance in the nursing-home setting. the question is how these current market-based reforms address these broad goals of long-term care. in theory these reforms are perfectly compatible with these goals of improving quality of life and reducing fragmentation and increasing community-based services but there are several key attributes of these market-based reforms that may limit their effectiveness in this regard. the first limitation is current market-based reforms tend to rely on narrowly defined clinical quality measures. this tends to reinforce a medical model of care which pays more attention to clinical quality than issues related to quality of life and a c
upfront? all the other states lose medicare vantage within five years, but florida is to keep it? why? these have to be dropped. with all respect to senator reid who says he cannot pass health care without these deals, then he is going nowhere. house members are disappointed, like the american people. there are two things to watch. legislation being made and sausage. -- there are two things you do not want to watch. this should stand on its merit. michigan was one of the first it's economically. -- one of worst states economically. let's pass this on policy. i always thought they would do a trigger. no greater than the rate of inflation, if it goes, trigger a public option. that is one when they talk about a compromise. that makes sense. this the one this side of the room. -- let's go to this side of the room. [inaudible] but it could all be for naught. congress starts january 2011 and said they disagree with health care. they could get rid of it. every congress has a right to review it. congress has been talking about this since teddy roosevelt first proposed a 100 years ago. for us
's developed and directed a number of national programs, including the center for medicare education, the better jobs, better care national program, funded by the robert wood johnson foundation and atlantic philanthropy. she was a political appointee during the clinton administration, serving in the u.s. department of health and human services as deputy assistant secretary for disability, aging and long-term care policy. she also was assistant secretary for aging in 1997. she's been a senior researcher at the national center for health services research, and at project hope center for health healthy communities fares previously, as well as -- health affairs previously, as well as at georgetown university. to begin, let's welcome to the podium, steven kay. >> some people focus on specific federal programs, or they might focus on quality issues or work force issues or family care giving, and they also tend to focus on specific population, such as the so-called frail elderly, on non-elderly people with disabilities or cognitive disabilities. as carol levine said in her article in this i
it. i don't see how you can take a program that is so indebted as medicare and inlarge it and say you are saving money it doesn't work. >> reporter: are you on medicare? >> yes. >> reporter: you are worried in this legislation that it is going to benefit you? >> it won't benefit me. it won't benefit america either. >> reporter: here in the doctor's office numbers two and three, sir what is your name? >> robert bentley. >> reporter: mr. bentley how do you feel about the legislation out of washington? >> i think it stinks. >> reporter: why don't you like it? >> i think they are giving the seniors a rough deal. i don't think harry reid is doing the job he's supposed to do. >> reporter: he's up for reelection here he may want to hear your message. how do you feel about the legislation in washington? >> i'm concerned. i know that i don't understand everything about it. but what i have read and heard people talk about, i am concerned as a senior citizen what it is going to do to our medicare. >> reporter: number four here what is your name? >> sylvia garcia. >> reporter: what do you think a
and they controlled my blood pressure and everything and does not cost me one time. i could be on medicare but i chose not to progress have been within the day since i have gotten out of the service in 71. but why are all of these test being run? i know it cost money. >> host: they do. testing and that has been a regular theme of yours with the regular habit -- article how to get to the point* where doctors, all on test that they say even are gold-plated? >> yes. your caller hit the button driving the process on the malpractice system which is driven in ways, an example. headaches. one community actually tried to look at how many ct scans in cedar rapids speed 13 for a population of 300,000, we all know this is not necessary. 10,000 were forehead ct scans only a tiny number turned up any abnormal -- abnormality some of them were ordinary headaches. some of it was fear of malpractice and more significant is that we have not established what the process is or a proper a guideline for care for handling the headache so we can do it the right way. we have tens of thousands of unnecessary ct scans that are
a grant funded by the national institute on aging to examine the -- examined the impact of medicare part de on medicare -- on nursing home residents. she also has a steady among cancer patients. that funding is provided by the national cancer institute and the department of veteran affairs. we're happy to have her here to speak about her article. we also have david stevenson whose recent work has focused on a range of topics in that sector, including long-term care financing options, the rising use of hospice care, and so on. we are delighted to have him speaking on the and assisted care -- on the assisted care piece. mary jane koren manages the commonwealth fund at the harvard program. she is an internist. she was vice president of the leslie samuels foundation in new york city prior to joining commonwealth. she began her career in geriatrics where she started a fellowship program and was the assistant medical director for the home health care agency. she has had plenty of experience in the real world. she is had plenty of experience in the real world delivery of these services. let's w
. it doesn't cost me a dime. i could be on medicare but i chose not to do it. i've been with the va since i got out of the service since '71. but why are all these tests being run and i know it cost money. >> host: thank you, dean. in fact testing and how much doctors has been a regular theme. here's one headline article, testing, testing, testing and how doctors are calling for a lot of tests they sometimes they say are gold plated more than they need? >> guest: your caller did hit the button which is our malpractice system which is driven in ways -- so let me give you an example. headaches, one community actually trade to look at how many ct scans in cedar rapids iowa they were doing for people. they found they were doing 52,000 ct scans. all of us know this isn't necessary. and 10,000 of them were for head ct scans. only a tiny number ended up turning it up any abnormallity. many of them were just headaches. and a more significant part of it is that we don't -- we have not really established what our process is, our appropriate guideline for care for handling the headache so that we can
. medicare. it doesn't cover everything. and what it doesn't cover can cost you some money. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some pd what medicare doesn't... so you could save up to thousands of dollars... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you choose your doctor. choose your hospital. and no referrals needed. there are no networks help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't cover. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... and medicare guide and find out... how you could start saving. >>> get to our "strategy session," helly rosin, a cnn political contributor and eric eri
. spending related to medicare, medicaid and social security will not be affected. neither will national security. all other discretionary programs will. finally, i have called for a bipartisan commission that will sit down and hammer out concrete deficit reduction proposals by a certain deadline. because we have heard plenty of talk and a lot of yelling on tv about deficits. it is time to come together and make the painful tauruses we need to eliminate those deficits. this past week, 53 democrats and republicans voted for this commission in the senate. but a failed when seven republicans who had co- sponsoring the idea in the first place suddenly decided to vote against it. that is one thing to have an honest difference of opinion, i will always respect to those that take a principled stand for what they believe even if i disagree with them. but what i want except is changing positions because it is good politics. . . >> less than an hour, that's how long they interrogated a terrorist and he was given a miranda warning and lawyer and not surprisingly he stopped talking. ho did we get to
to more commons. for example, with the healthcare, it is medicare and medicaid going bankrupt. if you brought in as the private insurers are able to jury began bring in healthy individuals to medicare -- are able to bring in and cherry pick healthy individuals -- perhaps a sliding scale -- it could bring healthy individuals paying full premiums into medicare to balance out the expenses we have now to pay for 65 and over. as you get older more medical bills. i would be interested to see c- span have some accountant or actuarial come in to run the numbers that exist for the private health insurers and have them make their profits. how to make medicare at a fee. host: banks, we will go at this point because we will have an hour-long later on health care. today concerning the senate, your view, the independent line from anderson, indiana. caller: it is truly disgusting after the display of the health care fiasco you have seen. the conservative an element is tearing up the fabric of democracy. after watching the sonia sotomayor confirmation hearings you have a 99 white guys who question pe
around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little or no cost to you. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your mobility and your life. one medicare benefit that, with private insurance, may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. hi i'm doug harrison. we're experts at getting you the power chair or scooter you need. in fact, if we qualify you for medicare reimbursement and medicare denies your claim, we'll give you your new power chair or scooter free. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. with help from the scooter store, medicare and my insurance covered it all. call the scooter store for free information today. >> gregg: now back to the devastation in haiti. in times of trouble, many of us turn to god. we do so obviously in haiti as well, but as you probably know, voodoo is also big in haiti and in the mist of this, many are clinging to the voodoo faith. maim any? >> we found
as medicare and enlarge it and say you are saving money. doesn't work. >>reporter: are you on medicare e.yes. >>reporter: you are worried in this legislation that it will benefit you. >> it won't benefit me. won't benefit america either. >>reporter: here this the doctor office numbers 2 and 3 speak to us. what is your name. >> robert bentley. >>reporter: mr. bently, how do you feel about the legislation coming out of washington? >> i think it stinks. >>reporter: why don't you like it? >> i think they are giving senior sentence a rough deal. i don't think harry reid is doing the job he's supposed to do. >>reporter: he's up for reelection in nevada so he may want to hear your message. mr mrs. bent lehow do you feel about the legislation in washington. >> i'm concerned. i know i don't understand everything about it but what i have read and heard people talk about, i am concerned as a senior citizen. what it is going to do to our medicare. >>reporter: number 4 here in the doctor clinic. what is your name ma'am. >> sylvia garcia. >>reporter: what do you think about the legislatio
insurance, lower your costs, all the insurance reforms, we're going to lower the cost of medicare and medicaid and it won't cost anybody anything. that's great politics. it's just not true. so, there's got to be some test of realism in any of these proposals, mine included. i've got to hold myself accountable. i guarantee the american people will hold themselves -- will hold me accountable if what i'm selling doesn't actually deliver. >> mr. president, point of clarification, what's in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals -- >> no, i understand that, i've actually read your bills. >>-- throughout 2009. >> i understand. >> so, rest assured, the summary document that you received is backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi and your administration has been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> mike. wait. hold on a second -- no, no, no, no, no, no, no. hold on a second. guys, you know, mike, i've read your legislation. i mean, i take a look at this stuff. and the good ideas, we take. but here's -- here's the thing -- here's the thin
it mean for obama? obama is just trying to perpetrate big government. obama is trying to cut medicare. there's some who think if obama loses, we win. >> sean: joining me reaction to all this karl rove the architect. i guess talking in the third person -- did you notice how angry he was today? >> yeah, absolutely. he did try and cut medicare. there was a reason people were saying that he laid out a plan to cut medicare by 456 billion dollars. of course people were saying obama is trying to cut medicare. i was amazed about that speech, he went on to say, look i've been trarpbs transparent in washington that's why people -- why people are up sent. didn't we see him conduct negotiations on the health care bill behind closed doors not on c-span as he promised? he said i'm the guy cutting waste and fraud out of the government. please, tell us where mr. president? last year he said i'm going to cut 100 million dollars in savings out of the budget that was 0.0003/100 of 1% of the budget. 3 vannatter 1,000% of the budget. it took weeks. finally he said i've been confronted on health care by th
medicare for seniors and stop insurance company abuses let me know. one of the criticisms the democrats have had of republicans you have no ideas and you are not helping, republicans say we are cut out of the deal, what is it? >> it is interesting he posed that question i had given a number of ideas in the direction that health care should take and unfortunately those ideas weren't incorporated. went into a different direction since i voted in the finance committee at that point hit considerable concerns but i thought it deserved continuing the process and seeing what we could do to bill the bridges. >> greta: seemed to be a couple layers in health care. one is substance. the second part is whether or not republicans are included in the discussion or not women? i talked to democrats they say republicans are obstructionists. republicans say they won't even include us. you have been in a unique position for a little while in december where you steam -- you seemed to be able to talk to democrats. are the republicans included in this discussion or not? >> they haven't been. they might have
government. obama is trying to cut medicare. there's some who think if obama loses, we win. >> sean: joining me reaction to all this karl rove the architect. i guess talking in the third person -- did you notice how angry he was today? >> yeah, absolutely. he did try and cut medicare. there was a reason people were saying that he laid out a plan to cut medicare by 456 billion dollars. of course people were saying obama is trying to cut medicare. i was amazed about that speech, he went on to say, look i've been trarpbs transparent in washington that's why people -- why people are up sent. didn't we see him conduct negotiations on the health care bill behind closed doors not on c-span as he promised? he said i'm the guy cutting waste and fraud out of the government. please, tell us where mr. president? last year he said i'm going to cut 100 million dollars in savings out of the budget that was 0.0003/100 of 1% of the budget. 3 vannatter 1,000% of the budget. it took weeks. finally he said i've been confronted on health care by the special interests. were you the guy who started off by putting
% rate increase? senior citizens in my district on average saw a 45% increase in their medicare advantage plans. 45% one year increase. that's simply unsustainable and the government certainly is never going to balance its budget without addressing the cost of health care. the gentleman from ohio. mr. ryan: i'd like to say that this happened. we didn't end up here, you know, a couple of octobers ago and all of a sudden things were just -- happened. our government was controlled by a conservative, neoconservative ideology for most of the first decade in this country. or of this century. from 2000 to 2008 they controlled the white house and from 2000 to 2006 they controlled the congress. implemented their economic philosophy. hook, line and sinker. it got implemented, they controlled all the levers of government, passed their supply side economics, cut taxes for the wealthiest, that will stimulate the economy and, you know, everything will take care of itself, deregulate wall street, everyone will be honest with each other, no one would possibly do anything wrong if we just weren't watching
to resolve their differences between the house and the senate version of the medicare reform legislation that provided prescription drug benefits for medicare recipients. a very important piece of legislation, one that was not without some controversy, the house passed a version, the senate passed a version, and then in the light of day these two versions were negotiated on these days, the american people got to see the discussions that went on and got to see this bill being crafted that eventually became law. if the democrats weren't engaging in these backroom deal making deals, i don't think they'd mind the lights being turned on but the problem is they're cutting deals and the reason they're having to cut deals is because they're trying to pats a -- pass a piece of legislation that the american people don't embrace. many of us agree that health care needs to be reformed. and my colleagues on my side of the aisle, republicans and conservatives, have been offering some commonsense ideas that could reform the current system without turning over the health care to the government, without
- term liabilities is medicare, medicaid, and health care spending. nothing comes close. social security would probably fix the same way to and ronald reagan sat down together and could figure something out. that is manageable. medicare and medicaid are a massive problem down the road. that is going to be what our children have to worry about. paul's approach, i want to be careful to not simplify this because i know you have a lot of detail in your plan, but i understand it to say that we will provide doctors of some sort for current medicare recipients at the current level. 55 and over. there is a grandfathering in for future beneficiaries. i just want to point out that i have read it. the basic idea is that at some point, we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not go way out of black. i am sure there are some details -- we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not have things going out of wahack. it has to be reformed for the younger generations because it is going bankrupt. why not give people the sa
medicare recipients at the current level -- >> no. >> no? 55 -- well, no, i understand. i mean, there's a grandfathering in. just for future agabeneficiarie. i want to make sure i'm not unfair to your proposal but point out i read it. the basic idea would be at some point we hold medicare cost percipient constant as a way of making sure that doesn't go way out of whack. >> a blend of inflation and health inflation. the point of our plan is, because medicare, as you know, is a $38 trillion unfunded liability. it has to be reformed for younger generations because it won't exist because it's going bankrupt. the prepgs of our idea is, why not give people the same kind of health care plan we here have in congress? that's the kind of reform we're proposing for medicare. >> look, look, as i said before this is an entirely legitimate proposal. the problem is twofold. one is that depending on how it's structured if recipients are suddenly getting a plan that has their reimbursement rates going like this but health care costs are still going up like that then over time the way we're saving mone
security. and medicare. people are worried about and no one is talking about. that is what the tea party is all about -- leave social security alone and leave medicare alone and if democrats tried to protect the -- protected, maybe they will keep the seats. but when they keep threatening $500 billion for medicare, 20 million illegal immigrants to get the jobs, they will let a problem. host: are you involved with the tea party or watching from the sidelines? caller: just watching from the sidelines but understand our point. to many people doing our jobs -- nobody wants to talk about illegal immigration. the president is turning his back on it and people are fed up, especially when they talk about social security and medicare. i am a baby boomer. my wife will be caught -- retire pretty soon. we are waiting for this and a lot of people feel the same way. host: doris is watching us from chicago on the democrats' line. caller: he did not mention anything about a 40,000 people who die every year who did not have health insurance. massachusetts told the people of the country, the only state tha
some money. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... so you could save up to thousands of dollars... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you choose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are no networks and no referrals needed. help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't cover. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... and medicare guide and find out... how you could start saving. >>> the fur is flying over a new peta advertising campaign. the white house wants the animal rights group to strip an ad from its website that features first
to the mayo clinic in arizona? i knew you didn't know. they said, we're not taking any medicare patients anymore because the government's payments are too low. now, other mayo clinic may follow, may not. but seniors, rightfully so, are very nervous about obama care cutting back on their medicare payments. so they're going to lash out at anybody supporting obama care. i'll give you the last word. go. >> they want medicare advantage, most seniors. aarp said medigap. the premium does the same thing, fills in the blank that medicare leaves. but it's more expensive in terms of the premium. so those people who are opposed to obama care are suggesting that what aarp did was a play to enrich their coffers from their insurance industry. but i think that more importantly, this is the biggest political phenomenon -- >> 15 seconds. >> the populous rage that has now caused dorgan in north dakota and dodd in connecticut to say they're retiring, i think that is the biggest political story right now, the first quarter of 2010. after that i think how that plays out will be how the futures of the parties
. they control my blood pressure and everything. it is not cost me a dime. i could be on medicare, but i chose not to do it. i've been with the va since i got out of the service in 1971. but why are all of these tests being run? and i know it costs money. host: thank you. in fact, testing has been a regular theme of your story here is 1 "new yorker" article with the headline, "testing, testing." guest: your caller hit the button on one of the issues driving the process, the malpractice system, which is driven in ways -- let me give you an example -- headaches. one community tried to look at how many ct scans and cedar rapids, iowa, they were doing for people. they did 50,000 cds dance for a population of 300,000 people a year. all of us know this is not necessary. 10,000 of them were for had ct scans, and only a tiny number of some of it was fear of malpractice suits. more significant part of it is that we have not really established what our process is, our appropriate guideline for care for handling the headaches so we can do it the right way, so we have tens of thousands of unnecessary ct s
ticket items, the entitlement spending, medicare, medicaid. that's exactly what the president has been working so hard with the congress to put in place some important reforms that will genuinely slow the growth rate of those costs. and that is the most fiscally responsible thing one could be doing at this point. >> ms. romer, final question. 660,000 people dropped out of the work force. what explains that and what happens if they come back in to the unemployment rate? one would assume it will go a lot higher. >> well, you're certainly right on both accounts in the sense that we did see people drop out of the labor force and that is something that tends to happen in recessions. people do become discouraged. and if we start -- when we start to add lots of jobs that will surely encourage some of those, discourage workers to come back in. i think the important thing, whatever effect that might have on the unemployment rate in the short run that would be a good thing. it would mean the economy is expanding, they do see hope, and that is something we'll be looking forward to in the sense of
, and medicare and private insurance had to pay for all this waste. all i am trying to say is that if you are going to put primary- care physicians in, you have to teach them to know what they are doing rather than to rely on specialists to get the answers. host: great, thank you. we have a la -- a lot of callers waiting. guest: what she is describing is the world. struggling with in edmonson. -- had the world we are struggling with in madison. we cannot know it all. we have been unwilling to admit that. we've been trained to get the idea that it is all going to be in our head, and we have not developed the systems in the place that can change that. it is why i ended up writing on something as mundane as developing a checklist across madison. we look at the aviation world and how they handle themselves, the skyscraper world, and we found the the first principle of successful conditions of complexity is for experts to admit to themselves that they are fallible, that they will fail at times, it will not remember everything, and then to build in those standards of practice, the checks on the
costs, all the insurance reforms, we're going to lower the costs of medicare and medicaid and it will not cost anybody anything. that is great politics, it is just not true. so there has got to be some test of realism in any of thesexd proposals, mine included. i have to hold myself accountable and guarantee the american people will hold me accountable if what i am selling does not actually deliver. >> mr. president, a point of clarification. what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals that were offered. >> i understand that. i have actually read your bills. >> through 2009. >> i a understand. -- i understand. >> the summary document you receive this backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi android restoration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> i have read your legislation. i take a look at this stuff and the good ideas we take. here is the thing that all this have to be mindful of. it cannot be all nothing, one way or the other. would the mean by that is thisÑi if we put together a stimulus package in w
've dealt with medicare patients for my entire practice, when you take $500 billion out of a plan that's already underfunded and goes upside down in premiums in about 2017 and beginning next year, the baby boomers hit, three million to three and a half million every year, you take half a trillion dollars out and add 30 million to 35 million people, three things happen. you have decreased access, two, you're not going to be able to get in to see the doctor, two, you have decreased quality and three, seniors get this their costs are going to get up to get the needed care they need. mr. akin: doctor, you are so eloquent and said it so smoothly, i think you we need to underline what you said. what you're saying is we're going to take $500 billion out of medicare. is this a republican that's going to raid medicare? mr. roe: no, sir. mr. akin: we've been accused of raiding medicare. but it's not us. mr. roe: no, sir, unless you're in florida, of course. mr. akin: if you take $500 billion out of medicare, it's going to be harder to provide services for people. you're not doing just that, you'
the center for medicare education, the better jobs better care of national program. she was a political appointee during the clinton administration, serving in the department of health and human services. she also was assistant secretary for aging in 1997. she is been a senior researcher for health services research and project hope center for health affairs previously. to begin, but welcome to the podium. let's welcome him to the podium. >> people tend to view long-term care through a particular lands, depending on what they are interested in. some people focus on specific federal programs. they might focus on quality issues or workforce issues. they also tend to focus on specific populations of elderly. as carol levine said in her article, the whole is often eclipsed by a separate part. this article is an attempt to paint a picture of that hole, although i realize there are plenty of my own biases in it. we include people receiving long-term care from public programs, from family members, from private paid workers, whether they live in the community or institutions, whether they are e
the deficit, cover the uninsured strengthen medicare for seniors and stop insurance company abuses, let me know. let me know. let me know. [ applause ] >> i'm eager to see it. here's what i ask congress, don't walk away from reform. not now. not when we are so close. let us fan a way to come together and finish the job for the american people. [ applause ] >> let's get it done. let's get it done. [ applause ] >> even as health care reform would reduce our deficit, it's not enough to dig us out of a massive fiscal hole in which we find ourselves. it's a challenge that makes all others that much harder to solve. and one that has been subject to a lot of political posturing. so let me start the discussion of government spending byzfd setting the record straight. at the beginning of thenk. last decade, the year 2000, america had a budget surplus of over 200 billion dollars. by the time i took office, we had a one year deficit of over one trillion dollars and projected deficits of eight trillion dollars over the next decade. most of this was the result of not paying for two wars, two tax cuts,
, medicare, medicaid, and defense spending. we're going to make any impact on the budget, if we're going to make any impact on the deficit, somebody son capitol hill has to have a political courage to go after those untouchable things and no one will do it. >> my point would be -- let's forget about pelosi and let's not focus on her. let's focus on all people in government now. we're in a financial crisis. leadership is about setting the example. the example should be let's freeze all these perks. let's all sacrifice and let's start with our leaders. >> all right. i am not defending congressional perks. if you want to move the needle, start with the big stuff. >> i'm with you. >> i think that's pretty high. >> don't hit my bar tab. >> i was going to say, are you the first one to self sacrifice. if you thought the speaker's bar tab was outrageous. listen to this. >> the gate is closed, the fence is too high, we'll pole vault in. if that doesn't work, we'll parachute in. >> find out what the house speaker wants to parachute in and why it could send our economy into a free fall. it's coming
monstrosity that took a half billion out of medicare, raised taxes a half billion dollars and raised insurance premiums for everybody is dead. we need to start over as we've been advocating for sometime and go step-by-step and fix the problem. which is cost. >> greta: that's what you want to do. is that going to happen? you think the democratic members of the senate are still going to proceed with the existing bill minus adjustments? >> as long as they try to restructure 1/6 of the economy cutting medicare, raising taxes and premiums i don't think it is going anywhere. leadership marks them out, right off the cliff politically trying to get them to pass a bill the people hated. i don't think they are going to have a stomach for that one more time. >> greta: do you think with the election of senator electric brown, have you seen any sort of changes one the democratic senators here or too early to tell? >> i think the attitude is they would like for this issue to go away for a while democratic senators many would like for this issue to go away for a while. >> greta: how about harry reid? >> i th
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